Publications

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Responding to Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Violence against Women and Girls

 

Full review

 

his Family Health and Safety Study (FHSS) was initiated through the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) Ministry of Internal Affairs and conducted by Women United Together
Marshall Islands (WUTMI). Though not the first study on family violence in the country, it is the most comprehensive.
Full review

 

All individuals and couples should have free access to information as well as family planning (FP) services as they wish and require. Family planning allows family and individuals to achieve their desired number of children and helps them determine the spacing of pregnancies between each other. Thus using appropriate quality contraceptive methods and providing treatment of
infertility will be the key factor to achieving family planning
Full review

 

Violence against women (VAW) is defined by the UN as “any act of gender-based violence that results in, or is likely to result in physical, sexual or psychological harm or suffering to women, including threats of such acts, coercion or arbitrary deprivation of liberty, whether occurring in public or private
life.”
1 Such violence is not limited to a specific culture, country, region, or to particular groups within a society. VAW affects all societies, including the Federated States of Micronesia (FSM). It not only has a direct impact on women who experience violence, but it also affects their families and community at large. Consequently, VAW also reinforces other forms of violence prevalent in society.
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   Many couples want to avoid pregnancy and  childbearing during crisis situations, but lack the means to do so UNFPA ships male and female condoms and other family planning supplies to affected areas within the first hours of an emergency The specific hygiene needs of women and girls are too often overlooked in emergencies. To help women and girls maintain their health and dignity, UNFPA distributes ‘dignity kits’ in disaster- and conflict-affected communities.
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The Republic of Kiribati (Kiribati) is considered to be one of the most demographically challenged Pacific Island nations due to its increasing population, low topography, rising sea
levels, need to adapt to climate change and issues with sufficient supplies of fresh water.
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This report provides a summary of updated population and development profiles of 15 Pacific countries. Four of these countries (Solomon Islands, Kiribati, Tuvalu and Vanuatu) are classified as Least Developed Countries (LDCs). All of these countries are politically independent, as are Fiji, Nauru and Tonga. Three countries (Palau, Marshall Islands and the Federated States of Micronesia) are associated to the United States through a Compact of Free Association. Two countries (Cook Islands and Niue) are self governing in free association with New Zealand, and the Tokelau Island is a dependent territory of New Zealand. The political status of each of the 15 countries has important consequences for both demographic dynamics and the level of development and how they are linked. With respect to Violence Against Women (VAW) national prevalence, the data was generated using WHO household survey methodology, with UNFPA technical support, in a majority of the Pacific countries. The primary data source for the core population indicators is the respective national census reports, although other national sources such as Demographic Health Surveys have also been used where appropriate. 
Full review

The State of the World’s Midwifery 2014 documents growing momentum since the first call to action in the 2011 report. Every year, more governments, professional associations and other partners are acting on the evidence that midwifery can dramatically accelerate progress on sexual, reproductive, maternal and newborn health and universal health coverage.

Full review

 

Ageing refers to the process whereby an increasing proportion of a population is aged 60 years and over. Up until the 1980s, most Pacific Island populations were either ageing slowly or not at all and the proportion of the population over 60 years remained below 6 percent. Median age remained within the range of 16-20 years. In the last two decades of the 20th century the pace of ageing accelerated and is projected to reach a peak around 2025. The number of older persons in the Pacific is projected to increase at an average annual rate of 3.7 percent between 2014 and 2050 and to grow in number from around 512 thousand to 2 million. The oldest old (80 years and over) is currently growing at a faster rate than the 60 and over age group. The oldest old are projected to increase at an average annual rate of 5 percent between 2014 and 2050 and by 2050 there will be 205 thousand persons aged 80 and over.
Full review

 

In 1994, the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), in Cairo, initiated a major paradigm shift from a demographic focused perspective of population and development to a new vision that focused on human rights, particularly the rights of individuals, couples and families, at the centre of relationships between population, development and human well-being. The comprehensive 20 year Programme of Action (PoA) that was adopted by 179 countries, including Pacific Island Countries, placed the right to sexual and reproductive health as well as gender equality and women’s empowerment at the core of its recommended population development strategies. 
Full review

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